Tune Yokohama http://tune-yokohama.com/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 03:16:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://tune-yokohama.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Tune Yokohama http://tune-yokohama.com/ 32 32 Wichita KS restaurants failed inspections November 14-20, 2021 https://tune-yokohama.com/wichita-ks-restaurants-failed-inspections-november-14-20-2021/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 11:03:00 +0000 https://tune-yokohama.com/wichita-ks-restaurants-failed-inspections-november-14-20-2021/

Twelve businesses, including eight restaurants, a grocery store, a hotel and two discount stores, failed their food safety and accommodation inspections from the Kansas Department of Agriculture last week. They have been cited for violations such as employees not washing their hands, cockroaches, broken sinks, storing raw meats by items they could leak on, plumbing issues, dirty equipment, faulty smoke detectors and old food, a Sedgwick County non-compliant inspection audit. from November 14 to 20 shows.

Information on the companies and infractions, compiled on November 21, appears below along with a summary of the issues noted by inspectors in their reports. More details, including specific descriptions of violations and dates of investigation, are posted in The Eagle’s searchable, non-compliant restaurant and hotel inspection database at www.kansas.com/ databases.

More than 50 companies surveyed last week passed their inspections with little to no violations. You can see them at www.foodsafety.kda.ks.gov/FoodSafety/Web/Inspection/PublicInspectionSearch.aspx.

Failure of an inspection does not necessarily mean that a business has to close; it’s rare. Most infringements are minor and are immediately corrected on the spot.

Businesses do not follow state rules when they have too many violations or certain types of issues that can increase the risk of a customer contracting a foodborne illness, or when an issue cannot be resolved. immediately, such as plumbing problems and pest infestations.

When a business goes bankrupt, it is usually inspected again within 10 days.

To complain about conditions anywhere food is served or sold to the public, email kda.fsl@ks.gov or call 785-564-6767.

Recent inspections for non-compliance

Comfort Inn & Suites, 7856 E. 36th St. North in Wichita – Fourteen violations. They include cleaning carts with chemicals touching the cups, no screens in several rooms, not enough flotation devices for the pool, no rope attached to the lifebuoy, leaves and debris in the pool, levels of chlorine in the pool, missing papers, broken emergency lighting, missing emergency plan in the room, smoke detectors not working in some rooms, no signs warning guests that pets are allowed. Next inspection: November 27.

Crestview Bevco Concert, 1000 N. 127th St. East in Wichita – Three violations. They include a cracked spatula, dirty tongs and a meat slicer, cockroaches. Next inspection: November 26.

Dillon, 3211 S. Seneca in Wichita – Four violations. They include raw chicken and beef stored on top of ham cooked in a cooler, raw poultry stored on top of other raw meats, deli cheese was not at a safe temperature, plumbing issue . Next inspection: November 29.

Mexican restaurant El Agave, 3236 N. Rock in Wichita – Eight violations. They include employees not washing their hands, the chicken base and beans were not at safe temperatures, rice and cheese at unsafe temperatures, menu items that require consumer notification are not unmarked, dirty can opener, plumbing problem, unlabeled chemical container. Next inspection: November 29.

El Fogon, 1555 S. Bluffview in Wichita – Seven violations. They include products and cheese at unsafe temperatures, meat and beans at unsafe temperatures, unmarked food jars with dates opened or prepared, no equipment to test the strength of the disinfectant, a knife dirty, a non-restaurant grade insecticide labeled for outdoor use was stored inside the company, documents missing. Next inspection: December 16.

El Maguey, 1221 N. Rock Road in Derby – Four violations. They include not marking the milk with the date opened, water not hot enough at the sinks, no soap at the sink, no labels on the chemical bottles. Next inspection: January 18.

El Rancho, 2801 N. Broadway in Wichita – Two violations. These include an employee cutting tomatoes without wearing gloves, a bad date on the bag of tamales. Next inspection: January 15.

Ninza Sushi Bar, 8428 W. 13th St., Ste. 100 in Wichita – Sixteen violations. They include employee not using soap to wash their hands, employee washed their hands in the wrong sink, improperly thawing fish, raw fish stored on top of raw jalapenos in a cooler, raw chicken stored on top of cantaloupe container, raw beef stored on top of cooked shrimp in cooler, sanitizer was too strong to wipe cloth bucket, employee did not wash them hands after handling raw shrimp, missing documents, thawing room temperature crabs of crab meat on the kitchen floor, eel sauce kept at the wrong temperature, food at unsafe temperatures, hand washing sink clogged, no soap or paper towels in the sinks, lack of hand washing sign at the kitchen sink. Next check. November 26.

Mexican restaurant in Puerto Vallarta, 602 N. Tyler Rd. In Wichita – Four violations. They include refried beans and dangerously hot pico de gallo, old achote sauce, no paper towels in the kitchen, the paper towel dispensers were not working. Next inspection: January 17.

Ross dress for less, 2740 N. Greenwich Ct. In Wichita – Three violations. They include not having hot water in the bathroom sink, garbage and debris “all over” the janitor’s closet floor, window cleaner stored in bags of chocolate and coffee. . Next inspection: November 25.

Ross dress for less, 8021 E. Kellogg Dr. in Wichita – Two violations. They include the water that does not heat enough at the level of the bathroom sinks, a space under the loading bay door that could let in parasites. Next inspection: November 26.

Yokohama ramen joint, 613 W. Douglas, Ste. A in Wichita – Eleven violations. These include employees who do not wash their hands after washing dishes and touching shrimp, unsafe temperature food, storing boba and broth at room temperature, storing cooked noodles at room temperature , milk and cream marked with wrong opening dates, cabbage and mushrooms labeled with wrong preparation dates. , old cheesecake, storing melted pork fat in a plastic shopping bag instead of a food grade container, do not sanitize dishes, store items in a hand washing sink, unlabeled chemicals, chemicals stored above Nutella containers. Next inspection: November 29.

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Amy Renee Leiker has been with The Wichita Eagle since 2010. She covers crime, courts and breaking news and updates the newspaper’s online databases. She is a mother of three and loves to read outside of work. Contact her at 316-268-6644 or aleiker@wichitaeagle.com.

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]]> How to feed the hungry while helping struggling restaurants survive https://tune-yokohama.com/how-to-feed-the-hungry-while-helping-struggling-restaurants-survive/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://tune-yokohama.com/how-to-feed-the-hungry-while-helping-struggling-restaurants-survive/

After lining a kitchen utility table with rows of food trays, team members at MadeMeals, a meal preparation service in Kearny, NJ, take their next steps cautiously and quickly.

They carefully place sliced ​​blackened chicken breasts and herbed roasted chicken thighs on platters with salads, roasted vegetables or green beans and brown rice pilau. Once all the platters have a protein, they are covered, bagged, and wrapped. Then the meals, about 300 in total, are refrigerated overnight, ready for delivery to New Jersey residents the next day.

MadeMeals is one of hundreds of restaurants and meal delivery services across New Jersey that are paid for by local nonprofit organizations through a new state program called Sustain and Serve. The program has awarded millions of dollars to nonprofits to partner with restaurants to feed New Jersey residents who struggle to eat regularly.

The program is seen as a “win-win-win” for nonprofits, food insecure residents, and small businesses that may be struggling during the coronavirus pandemic.